January Bonus Recipe: Ebi Okonomiyaki (エビお好み焼き)

Yesterday I tried making okonomiyaki again and, I have to say, I’m getting good at this! It was the first time I’ve made a really ‘successful’ okonomiyaki, and it tasted great. I think the success might have been down to using slightly better ingredients than usual, and taking my time a bit more. For those of you that don’t know, okonomiyaki (お好み焼き) is usually described as a ‘Japanese savoury pancake’, and the word ‘okonomiyaki’ basically means ‘what you like – grilled’. So, in the spirit of ‘what you like’, I have created my own ebi (prawn) okonomiyaki recipe.

All of the ingredients you’ll see below should be available from your local Japanese or Asian supermarket (if you’re in Japan, that’s just your local supermarket, you lucky things!). This time I bought my ingredients at my local store, Atariya, in North Finchley. Don’t be put off by using Japanese ingredients – as long as you can find okonomi sauce, the rest can be improvised!

Ebi Okonomiyaki (エビお好み焼き)

Ingredients (serves up to 6)

  • 100g okonomiyaki flour (Various types are available, but this time I tried one which included some powdered prawns and scallops. You can use plain flour though, if you can’t find okonomiyaki flour.)
  • 160ml water
  • 2 eggs
  • 300g cabbage (shredded) (You can use any kind of cabbage – this time I used a regular British cabbage, but Chinese cabbage works well too.)
  • 2 spring onions (Can substitute with leeks.)
  • 100g cooked, shelled prawns (I’m often really lazy and buy them ready cooked from the supermarket, but this time I bought fresh ones and cooked them and they were much tastier!)
  • Okonomi sauce (お好みソース)
  • Mayonnaise (I used Kewpie, because I prefer the taste of Japanese mayonnaise, but you can use any type you like.)
  • Katsuobushi (かつおぶし) (Sometimes called ‘bonito’, this is dried, fermented, smoked skipjack tuna . If you can’t find this (or can’t afford it), you can leave it off.)
  • Aonori (アオノリ) (A kind of powdered seaweed.)
  • Tenkasu (天かす) (Crunchy bits of deep-fried flour batter – it’s the first time I tried using this ingredient in okonomiyaki!)
  • Vegetable oil

Cooking: Ebi Okonomiyaki

Method

Cook the prawns in a little oil until they are pink, then set them to one side.

Cooking: Ebi Okonomiyaki

Whisk the flour and water until smooth. Add the eggs.

Cooking: Ebi Okonomiyaki

Add the chopped vegetables and gently mix.

Cooking: Ebi Okonomiyaki

Add the prawns and tenkasu and gently mix.

Cooking: Ebi Okonomiyaki

Pour the mixture into a frying pan and cook it like a pancake. Be patient!

Cooking: Ebi Okonomiyaki

Cooking: Ebi Okonomiyaki

When the mixture starts to solidify, flip it over.

Cooking: Ebi Okonomiyaki

When both sides are cooked, simply slip the okonomiyaki onto a plate.

Drizzle with okonomi sauce, mayonnaise, aonori and finally katsuobushi. Watch the katsuobushi ‘dance’ with the heat – it’s mesmerizing!

Cooking: Ebi Okonomiyaki

Cooking: Ebi Okonomiyaki

いっただきます!Let’s eat!

Cooking: Ebi Okonomiyaki

☆★☆

I’m really enjoying my Japanese cookery experiments at the moment, which is why you get a bonus recipe this month! I’ll be back as usual with my monthly recipe in February and don’t forget, this time the recipe choice is up to YOU! Just take a look at this post and vote for the recipe you’d like me to cook.

20 thoughts on “January Bonus Recipe: Ebi Okonomiyaki (エビお好み焼き)

  1. I don’t normally use Okonomiyaki flour and just use normal flour. But instead of water, I always make Dashi-soup and mix with flour. Also, put grated Japanese yam (山芋/ Yamaimo)or Yamaimo powder if you can find it. Please note, do not use normal yam, it seems Japanese yam is different from normal yam and if you use normal yam, it makes a bit stinky.

    Also, I normally pour Tonkotsu sauce instead of Okonomi-yaki sauce. Yam yam!

    Since last friday, it’s really getting cold. How is about making 鍋物(Nabemono / Japanese hot pot)?

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    • Thank you for your feedback, Akihiro! The flour I used this time had yam in it, so it was very convenient. Maybe it’s cheating a bit – but it worked really well! I’m not sure if I can eat tonkotsu sauce – I discovered yesterday that I can eat oknomi sauce but I can’t eat yakisoba sauce because it has meat in it! Japanese food is tricky for me sometimes.

      Ah yeah, nabe would be good! I wish I had a kotatsu and I could have a nabe party around the kotatsu! 😉

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  2. It looks delicious! It’s really easy if you can get the pre-prepared flour with yamaimo in it, which makes it more “sticky”, but I heard you can also add a little potato starch if you can’t get the pre-prepared type. Or maybe some rice flour? I’ll have to experiment. Also, if you can’t get okonomiyaki / tonkatsu sauce, you can make your own – my Japanese “grandma” mixes ketchup with worcestershire and a dash of soy sauce, approximately 3:1:1. I have a friend who is strictly vegetarian, and we once tried to order a “vegetarian” okonomiyaki, thinking that they could just make it with cabbage, but the chef refused, apologising that he needed to use dashi in the mix, or it would taste awful. It must be very hard to be vegetarian or vegan in Japan! Just fish is definitely do-able though!

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    • Thanks for your comment! I didn’t realise it would be so easy to make the sauce myself – I’ll have to give it a go! Yeah, it is pretty hard to be a veggie or vegan in Japan and, actually, even being a pescetarian is hard! There’s pork in a lot of things that you wouldn’t even think of – like seafood cup ramen! (>_<)

      Like

    • Hi Shiela, thanks your your message1 Good luck with the okonomiyaki. the great thing is, you can put anything in it if you can’t eat shrimp – meat, other fish or seafood, even soya products. 🙂

      Like

  3. Hi, I saw you in the Japanese TV program TOKYO BOY last night. It must be re-run, I guess. I am really glad to know that there is a girl like you who likes Japanese culture. You are really doing a good job.

    Like

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